The Math You Need So You’ll Never Skip Class Again

*This post was created by request on behalf of a UNI 101 class about financial literacy.*

Missing class when you have a good reason to miss is one thing, but when I was a college student *cough* years ago, I found myself skipping one of my general education classes consistently my first year just because I didn’t feel like going to it. Not only did this hurt my education, it also cost me a lot of money. During my first couple semesters of undergrad, I had a really hard time with going to class… that is, until I learned the math behind each class I attended (or skipped). I’m about to rock your world, or make your stomach hurt, but either way—this is the math I was taught to do so that if I wanted to miss class “just because” again—I’d think twice about it.

The  “tuition and fees” payments you make are part of this equation, and it personally helped me to add up the cost of my education in terms of how much money was spent each time I went to class (or didn’t go). Note that this doesn’t include room & board OR food costs if you live on campus…just your tuition. Let me break it down for you in an example. This tuition number may seem low or high to you, depending on the type of institution you’re attending and whether you are paying an in-state, out-of-state, or international student tuition rate.

Say your tuition and fees for the semester are $5200.
You’re registered for 12-hours or 4 courses.
Divide your tuition and fees number by number of courses: (5200/4) = $1300.

That’s $1300 per three-credit hour class. That’s a lot of money, right? Let’s break it down further.

Say your class meets once per week (for 16-weeks):
That’s $1300/16 meetings = $81.25 per class.

Say your class meets twice per week (for 16-weeks):
That’s $1300/32 meetings = $40.63 per class.

Say your class meets three times per week (for 16-weeks):
That’s $1300/48 meetings = $27.08 per class.

No matter how you stack it, missing class “just because” means you’re not only missing out on the lecture, course notes/materials, and course discussion that you need to master the course and earn the grade you want—you’re also literally throwing money away. I don’t know about you—but I certainly don’t have a disposable $27-$81 to throw away “just because.” Whether you’re paying for your education with grants, scholarships, student loans, or your own money—I hope this tip helps you realize the monetary importance of showing up and going to class. And if you’re #blessed enough for someone to be helping you pay for your education, definitely go to class.

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